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Biafra: Prof Uju Anya Gives Reason For Wishing Excruciating Pain To Queen Elizabeth II

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Professor Uju Anya has received heavy backlash over the ‘excruciating’ statement while reacting to the demise of Queen Elizabeth II, whose 70 years of reign ended yesterday at 96the age.

The tweet, which has attracted various reactions and was further disabled by the media giant, Twitter wished the Queen to experience pain resting in her bosom upon learning the unfortunate news.

In her @Ujuanya words:
I heard the chief monarch of a thieving raping genocidal
empire is finally dying. May her pain be excruciating.

Jeff Bezos (@JeffBezos) and many personalities across the globe have come against the professor’s stance, noting her position does not represent one contributing to making the world a better place.

Jeff’s post read: “This is someone supposedly working to make the world better? I don’t think so. Wow.

However, Mr. Anya has added to her early statement explaining the sudden outburst.

She noted the reign of the deceased Queen oversaw the killing of Biafrans and continued suffering her family experiences currently.

If anyone expects me to express anything but disdain for the monarch who supervised a government that sponsored the genocide that massacred and displaced half my family and the consequences of which those alive today are still trying to overcome, you can keep wishing upon a star.

BRIEF ABOUT THE LINGUIST

Dr. Uju Anya is a university professor and researcher in critical sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, and critical discourse studies.

Prof. Uju Anay Photo/online

 

Her discipline primarily examines race, sexual and social class identities in new language learning via the experiences of African American students.

Dr. Anya’s extended area of inquiry also involves applied linguistics as a practice of social justice and trans-languaging in world language pedagogy.

She’s presently teaching and conducting research as an associate professor of second language acquisition at the Carnegie Mellon University Department of Modern Languages.

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